RSS Feed

Category Archives: artist

The eye is the window into the soul, but it also is how we look out at the world.

The eye is the window into the soul, but it also is how we look out at the world.

 

The eye is the window into the soul, but it also is how we look out at the world. So I decided to use the eye to represent some of the ways women do this: the extroverted, the introverted, beginning a somewhat scarey opportunity, and contemplating the opposite sex. They were shown in the recent Womens Business exhibition.

Two different techniques have been used in these pieces. They are all 4-layer fused glass panels(200 x 150 mm), but the eye and eyelid are created with application upon application of glass powders on 3 of the glass sheets, giving a softer, more dimensional effect than the figures, which are painted on one of the layers with onglaze.

Outward” was inspired by the eye of a lively young female Parks Victoria ranger.
Inward was inspired by a magazine article and a photo of a woman who had experienced multiple family tragedies.
Onward was inspired by the eye of a woman who came to Melbourne from Asia as a teenager.
Other, somewhat the odd bod in the series and actually the first, was inspired by the eye of a very good-looking tour guide of Irish-Aboriginal ancestry in the Kimberley.
eil2eil3

eil4eil5

Advertisements

Congratulations Evelyn for your honest interview about the love and energy that you apply to every part of your art practice in the forthcoming April issue of Art Trends.

Congratulations Evelyn for your honest interview about the love and energy that you apply to every part of your art practice in the forthcoming April issue of Art Trends.

I have included Evelyns full interview and a picture of one of the works (chastity belt) that Evelyn has spoken about.

evelyns chastity belt

Interviewer:  Vicky Stojanovska for article ‘Australian artists and their art practices

Magazine:  Art Trends April Issue
Artist: Evelyn Young

What inspired you to get involved in the art world?

From a very early age I’ve always enjoyed the process of mark making. Whether it was with mud, pencil, collage, paint or homemade squashed flower petal inks. As I grew older I found the excitement of creating a new piece of artwork remained with me. It became a heavenly obsession.

How do I handle positive and negative criticism?

I tend to be a very harsh critic of my own work, therefore if the works have met my demanding standards, I tend not to give a lot of weight to negative criticism from others. There is however, a core group of fellow artists whose opinion I do value, and they can at times add valuable insight into the piece I’m working on, often challenging me on my ideas and methods.

What makes my art mine “unique”

I value originality above all other considerations when creating my art. With so many other artists having gone before me, I try to bring my own interpretation to my work, aiming for simplification and expressive works that have a narrative that the viewer can relate to. Working with the mixed mediums of glass, wood, ceramics and wrought iron tends to set my sculpture apart from others because of the technical skills needed to create these works.

Which pieces standout the most to me to date?

There are three sculptures that I think are my standout pieces to date.   My chastity belt mounted on a giant key wedged into a blue stone rock, was one of my most challenging and rewarding sculptures.  I had to undertake a smithing course at a forge to complete the work. My giant abacus made from hard wood, ceramic balls and wrought iron was an example of perseverance and vision, having taken a year to complete with many technical challenges involved in its construction. The porcelain sculpture titled “choices” was one of my more evocative works, as I examined the roles women embrace, or have had forced upon them to survive in a patriarchal society. I would like to think all three sculptures engage the viewer and start a conversation about the work. It certainly started a conversation at the forge amongst the men folk.

What’s in store for 2014

As I have undertaken to have no exhibition commitments this year, I plan to play and explore all the possibilities presented to me when working with steel and wire. Drawing inspiration from the works of Calder and Kipplel I want to explore the different shadow play created when light and mobility are added to the mix. The journey to me is often as enjoyable as the finished work.